We’ve all heard that a glass of wine a day is healthy or that spinach is a good source of iron. But what is true and what is a myth?



There are many misconceptions about what is healthy and what is unhealthy. Insight is a constant process: what was accepted as true yesterday could be scientifically refuted today. But how do myths become embedded, even in the scientific community? Why can’t we simply replace old insights with new ones? Everything from methodological errors to manipulation can play a role. New myths aren’t just created in spite of science, but sometimes even with its help. One example: detoxing is a very popular myth at the moment. Removing toxins from the body is based on an understanding of medicine dating back to the early 20th Century. But modern medical experts say this notion of a build-up of toxins is nonsense. So why is it so hard to debunk the detox myth when it has no scientific basis? Dr. Lilian Krist, an epidemiologist at the Charité Hospital in Berlin says: “People want to believe in something. For many, these diet hypes and lifestyle trends have become a substitute religion.” New studies often throw up more questions than answers and more room for wrong interpretations – or even deliberately false conclusions. Once wrong information has become embedded in our brains, it’s difficult to get rid of again. Cognitive psychologist Ullrich Ecker has discovered that established myths people have believed in for generations are incredibly resilient. There’s even a boomerang effect: the more we try to destroy a myth, the more people believe in it.


A village in northern Spain has become a hive of prostitution. La Jonquera, close to the French border, has become home to a large number of brothels.



Sex workers also line the streets and locals are worried about both their safety and their reputation. “It is a problem for the whole country,” says Sònia Martínez Juli, mayor of La Jonquera: “The first thing people see when they arrive in Spain are prostitutes.” The owner of what he says is the biggest sex club in Europe, “Paradise”, predictably defends his business. The Spaniard Dani Farled, meanwhile, the son of a sex worker, is more critical of the industry. His mother worked for years as a prostitute in La Jonquera; his father was her pimp. Today, he remains in the milieu, where he works as a tattoo artist. In the film, French sex tourists, who account for ninety percent of the market here, explain their motives and a Romanian street prostitute explains why Spain is an attractive place for her to work. A recent study by the Madrid University Comillas found that Spain was well on its way to becoming Europe’s leading nation when it comes to the sex industry: It already has more prostitutes than any other European nation.

Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time.


Bonobo apes are experts in using rainforest plants as medicine. But they’re now endangered because of poaching and deforestation. Will the secrets of the rainforest die with them? Find out in: RAIN FOREST PHARMACY – MEDICINE FROM THE JUNGLE.



Dr Barbara Fruth is in the Democratic Republic of Congo to study the apes and learn more about the rainforest pharmacy. Her team of international researchers is in a race against time – can they finish their work before the apes’ medical knowledge is lost forever?

Exciting, powerful and informative – DW Documentary is always close to current affairs and international events. Our eclectic mix of award-winning films and reports take you straight to the heart of the story. Dive into different cultures, journey across distant lands, and discover the inner workings of modern-day life. Subscribe and explore the world around you – every day, one DW Documentary at a time.


In this follow-up to his film BIGGER FASTER STRONGER, director Chris Bell turns his camera on the abuse of prescription drugs and, ultimately, himself. After witnessing friends and relatives face tragedy as they become addicted to prescription drugs,



Bell sets out to explore the goals of pharmaceutical companies and doctors in this ever-growing market and asks how are they any different to back-alley drug-pushers? His journey leads to experts on the nature of addiction in our culture as well as to pharmaceutical whistleblowers that testify to the solely dollar-driven aims of pharmaceutical companies. As Bell learns more about the nefarious side of an industry he had been brought up to trust, he falls down his own hole of addiction, bringing a very intimate style and conclusion to this investigation.


The Seven Wonders of the World (or the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World) refers to remarkable constructions of classical antiquity listed by various authors in guidebooks popular among the ancient Hellenic tourists, particularly in the 1st and 2nd centuries BC. The most prominent of these, the versions by Antipater of Sidon and an observer identified as Philo of Byzantium, comprise seven works located around the eastern Mediterranean rim. The original list inspired innumerable versions through the ages, often listing seven entries. Of the original Seven Wonders, only one—the Great Pyramid of Giza, the oldest of the ancient wonders—remains relatively intact.


Background

In this painting by Maerten van Heemskerck, the seven wonders of the ancient world are depicted as a background for the abduction of Helen by Paris. The Walters Art Museum.

The Greek conquest of much of the known world in the 4th century BC gave Hellenistic travellers access to the civilizations of the Egyptians, Persians, and Babylonians. Impressed and captivated by the landmarks and marvels of the various lands, these travellers began to list what they saw to remember them.

Instead of “wonders”, the ancient Greeks spoke of “theamata” (θεάματα), which means “sights”, in other words “things to be seen”. (Τὰ ἑπτὰ θεάματα τῆς οἰκουμένης [γῆς] Tà heptà theámata tēs oikoumenēs [gēs]) Later, the word for “wonder” (“thaumata” θαύματα) was used, and this is also the case in modern Greek (Επτά θαύματα του αρχαίου κόσμου). Hence, the list was meant to be the Ancient World’s counterpart of a travel guidebook.

Each person had his own version of the list, but the best known and earliest surviving was from a poem by Greek-speaking epigrammist Antipater of Sidon from around 140 BC. He named six of the seven sites on his list—leaving out the lighthouse—, but was primarily in praise of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

Another 2nd century BC observer, who claimed to be the mathematician Philo of Byzantium, wrote a short account entitled The Seven Sights of the World. However, the incomplete surviving manuscript only covered six of the supposedly seven places, which agreed with Antipater’s list.

Earlier and later lists by the historian Herodotus (484 BC–ca. 425 BC) and the architect Callimachus of Cyrene (ca. 305–240 BC), housed at the Museum of Alexandria, survived only as references.

The Colossus of Rhodes was the last of the seven to be completed, after 280 BC, and the first to be destroyed, by an earthquake in 226/225 BC. Hence, all seven existed at the same time for a period of less than 60 years. Antipater had an earlier version which replaced Lighthouse of Alexandria with the Walls of Babylon. Lists which preceded the construction of Colossus of Rhodes completed their seven entries with the inclusion of the Ishtar Gate.


Scope

It is thought that the limitation of the lists to seven entries was attributed to the special magical meaning of the number. Geographically, the list covered only the sculptural and architectural monuments of the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern regions, which then comprised the known world for the Greeks. Hence, extant sites beyond this realm were not considered as part of contemporary accounts.

The primary accounts, coming from Hellenistic writers, also heavily influenced the places included in the wonders list. Five of the seven entries are a celebration of Greek accomplishments in the arts and architecture (the exceptions being the Pyramids of Giza and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon).


The core of the video is a workshop pedagogical on the Theory of Special Relativity as part of the educational process conducted by our youth leadership, not for the sake of understanding the theory itself, but using Einstein’s particular discovery as a case study to demonstrate and walk people through real human thinking, as being something above sense perceptions or opinions.



We end with reflecting on the principle of relativity in terms of social relations and individual identities or thought processes, asking the question –how was Einstein able to make his breakthrough?

Einstein’s personality, his method of thinking, and his theories. Our “narrow path” has led us primarily through Kepler, Fermat, Leibniz, Gauss, and Riemann; all representing a higher potential of man’s creativity, who contributed to distinct up-shifts in human knowledge.

Our mission in presenting such material is to provide an example of how a mind overcomes the variable and false nature of the senses to discover true invariant principles.

In reliving these ideas for one’s self, each person gets a chance to become acquainted with what separates them from an animal, their own innate creativity. These mental exercises are not only intended to improve one’s knowledge in history, science, and culture, but are intended to help one’s understanding generally in economics, politics, and beyond.