Saddle up on your steel horse and blast down the highway into the world of The Mongols Motor Club with HIDDEN in AMERICA. From backyard brawls in Silicon Valley to kung-fu battles in the backstreets of the Bronx, Hidden in America investigates the codes and core values of America’s Underground Fight Clubs.



How were our Stone Age ancestors capable of building gigantic structures like burial mounds and stone rings? An insight into the history of humankind.



Around 12,000 years ago, humans underwent a transition from the mobile lifestyle of hunter-gatherers to the settled life of farmers. That epoch, the Stone Age, produced monumental building works. How did our ancestors live and build back then? Part 2 of this two-part documentary takes us to unique archaeological sites in Scotland, Brittany, Austria, Malta, Turkey and Jordan. The gigantic stone circles, temples and tombs from the Stone Age beg the question not only as to why this effort was made, but also of how, given the technical possibilities of the time, our ancestors were capable of building structures like the Barnenez burial mound or the stone ring of Orkney. How many people did they need to transport a 20-ton stone? A team led by experimental archaeologist Wolfgang Lobisser carries out a test with a wooden sledge and a two-ton stone block. The Neolithic seems to have been a fairly peaceful era; at least, no artifacts indicating military conflicts have been found so far. Raids and attacks that wiped out entire villages have only been confirmed for the later Bronze Age. But the foundations of many disputes were laid back then. In addition to cult objects, the Neolithic also saw the development of the first trading systems. “The people of the Neolithic were the first to become really dependent on material goods,” says Marion Benz from the University of Freiburg, pointing to wafer-thin sandstone rings that researchers have found in large numbers in the Neolithic village of Ba’ja in Jordan. We need to know about prehistory in order to understand the present. Population explosion, consumerism and megacities are ultimately the heritage of the Neolithic period, when sedentary societies first appeared.



DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.


During the Stone Age, humans shifted from the nomadic lifestyle to the more settled life of farmers. A documentary on an important period of human history.



Around 12,000 years ago, humans underwent a transition from nomads to settlers. That epoch, the Stone Age, produced monumental building works. Part 1 of this two-part documentary illuminates the cultural background of these structures and shows the difficulties Stone Age humans had to contend with. Until around 10,000 BC, humans lived as hunters and gatherers. Then an irreversible change began. Settlements formed. “For millions of years humans lived as foragers and suddenly their lives changed radically. This was far more radical than the start of the digital age or industrialization,” says prehistorian Hermann Parzinger, president of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. For a long time, scholars believed that a sedentary lifestyle was a prerequisite for constructing large buildings. Then archaeologist Klaus Schmidt discovered Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, a 12,000-year-old complex of stone blocks weighing up to 20 tons. Its builders were still hunter- gatherers. They decorated the stone columns with ornate animal reliefs. How these structures were used and who was allowed access to them remains a mystery. But we now know that the site was abandoned and covered over once settlements took root. Human development continued its course. The discovery of agriculture and animal husbandry led to larger settlements, a changed diet and ultimately to dependence on material goods. This social upheaval in the late Neolithic period has influenced our lives up to the present day. But experts agree that the monuments of the Stone Age prove that humans have gigantomanic tendencies and a need to immortalize themselves.



DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary.


The Rare and Exotic Animals – National Geographic Documentary. The white lion is a rare color mutation of the Timbavati area. White lions are the same as the tawny African Lion (Panthera leo krugeri) found in some wildlife reserves in South Africa and in zoos around the world. White lions are not a separate subspecies and are thought to be indigenous to the Timbavati region of South Africa for centuries, although the earliest recorded sighting in this region was in 1938. Regarded as divine by locals, white lions first came to public attention in the 1970s in Chris McBride’s book The White Lions of Timbavati. Up until 2009, when the first pride of white lions was reintroduced to the wild, it was widely believed that the white lion could not survive in the wild. It is for this reason that a large part of the population of white lions now reside in zoos.


FREE TO PLAY is a feature-length documentary that follows three professional gamers from around the world as they compete for a million dollar prize in the first Dota 2 International Tournament. In recent years, E Sports has surged in popularity to become one of the most widely-practiced forms of competitive sport today. A million dollar tournament changed the landscape of the gaming world and for those elite players at the top of their craft, nothing would ever be the same again. Produced by Valve, the film documents the challenges and sacrifices required of players to compete at the highest level.



The Rio Grande Valley has been at the frontline of some of the most contentious recent conflict in the US memory. But they’ve also found themselves at the frontline of another kind of conflict — and HIV epidemic affecting increasing numbers of young, queer, latino men.



VICE went to the US/ Mexico border to see why HIV is affecting increasing numbers of latinx youth, and to meet a small group of drag queens who are using their platform fight the stigma surrounding HIV head on.


Unblinking and unsettling, this documentary lays bare a mysterious process that goes on all around us – what happens to people who die with no next of kin.



Dead bodies in various stages of decomposition are seen, but not played for shock factor. Instead, you learn a little about each person, both what they were before death and what will happen to them afterward. They are followed from the discovery of the body to the final disposition of the remains, and each step in between.